Stainless Steel Tomahawk - Atlas Chipping Hammers Cone and Chisel - Wooden Handle

 

Stainless Steel Tomahawk - Atlas Chipping Hammers Cone and Chisel - Wooden Handle Video


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Blade Type Information: 420 Stainless Steel

420 is the numerical designation for a grade of stainless steel. The 400 series includes ferritic and martensitic chromium alloys, with 420 specifically referring to Cutlery Grade martensitic, which is similar to Brearley's original rustless steel and possesses excellent polishability.

Type 420 Stainless Steel, a modification of 410, has a higher carbon content to increase hardness, improve strength and give better wear resistance. Type 420 Stainless Steel provides both corrosion resistance as well, and is commonly used in dental and surgical instruments, cutlery, plastic molds, pump shafts, steel balls, and numerous hand tools.

Type 420 resists corrosion by the atmosphere, fresh water, steam, carbonic acid, crude oil, gasoline, perspiration, alcohol, ammonia, mercury , sterilizing solutions, soaps and other similar corrosives.

Handle Material Information: American Hickory

American Hickory (Carya juglandacae) is a deciduous hardwood tree, indigenous to the North American East Coast and Midwest. The name hickory came into the English language in 1618 from pawcohiccora, the Algonquian word for a food made of pounded nuts and water. Native Americans used hickories for dye and valued them for their strong, hard wood. The wood has been used for hundreds of years in the United States for tools and products and is still used very often today.

Hickory wood was so tough, the expression came to mean something or someone unyielding. President Andrew Jackson was called "Old Hickory" because he was considered such a tough fighter. When hickory was brought to Europe, it was used for walking sticks and golf clubs. In 1826 club manufacturer Robert Forgan of Scotland began to use hickory for club shafts. It quickly became the wood of choice for golfers the world over. By 1900 baseball bat manufacturers were using hickory wood in the United States for bats that were sometimes called hickories.

American hickory is still used to day in the production of many tools, weapons and sports equipment and is especially useful for handles because of its combination of stiffness and durability and shock absorption.

Rockwell Hardness: HRC 51-53

The Stainless Steel Tomahawk - Atlas Chipping Hammers Cone and Chisel - Wooden Handle has a Rockwell Hardness of HRC 51-53

Stanley P. Rockwell inevnted the Rockwell Hardness Test in 1919 while working as a metallurgist in ball bearing plant. Rockwell wanted to measure the uniformity and hardness of inner and outer rings on which the ball bearings rolled. He designed a device that could measure hardness accurately and quickly.

The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standardized a set of scales for testing Rockwell hardness values. Each scale has been designated a letter and corresponds to a different group of materials. Scale C is used for steel, titanium, deep case hardened steel, hard cast irons and other materials harder than scale B 100.

Knife blades and other steel hardened tools are made from metals that match to the Rockwell C scale. Most blade makers display the hardness number as "HRC xx" or "HRC xx - xx" providing a range, where "xx" indicates a Rockwell hardness number. Not many blades measure over HRC 70. Most functional blades rate somewhere between HRC 56 and HRC 63.

Generally, blades with a lower HRC number don't hold and edge for long under demanding use, but they are easier to sharpen. Blades with a higher HRC value stay sharp for longer, but are more difficult to sharpen. As an example, stainless steel has a HRC higher than carbon steel, but it is also more difficult to sharpen than carbon steel.

Company Information: Atlas

Atlas Knife Company is small business dedicated to making quality blades by hand. Over the years, the company has improved their forging techniques and the result has been custom made knifes with all the attention to detail you could possibly want. The knives themselves are simple in design, yet the quality is superb over that which you could find from a bigger manufacturer. Made with stainless steel, a knife from Atlas is utilitarian, simple, and beautiful at the same time.

A consumer can find Atlas blades in over 100 shops in the continental United States. The price is indicative of a custom, handmade knife. Some of the blades have etched designs on them, the handles mostly made with hard woods, polished to a brilliant shine. You can use these blades every day, never chipping the edge nor marring the surface. As with any stainless steel blade, some care is needed to keep them in a new condition but it is minimal, and although some of the blades are exquisite to look at, they are all made to be used. They are made to cut and chop and should definitely be put to work with some regularity.

Atlas Company does not only sell knives. They also have forges, burners, and etchers for those who are starting to become artisan knife makers themselves. Their forges include adjustable sliding tool rests, regulator hoses, and steel burners. All important accessories when starting the business. To make beautiful, eye catching etches on the surface of your newly minted blades, their etchers are all you need. They are push button activated for rapid pulse etching. You can also use them with 3rd party stamp pads if you so desire. These etchers and forges may be purchased from a variety of on line sources.

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